JazzTimes “échos la nuit” review

June 10, 2019 With a sound that gives off an after-hours feel and a command of his instrument that is both majestic and gritty, cultivated over a ballooning catalog, alto saxophonist Michaël Attias has long been a major player on the cutting-edge jazz scene. 2017’s superb Nerve Dance, credited to the Michaël Attias Quartet, manifested aContinue reading “JazzTimes “échos la nuit” review”

Citizen Jazz “échos la nuit” review

June 2, 2019 Saxophone et piano, deux instruments et un solo. Michael Attias publie aujourd’hui un travail qu’il mène depuis 2006 dans lequel il joue à la fois des deux instruments. De manière concomitante d’ailleurs puisqu’il ne s’agit pas d’utiliser les possibilités d’un studio et du réenregistrement mais plutôt d’envisager le piano comme matrice harmonique et mélodique auxContinue reading “Citizen Jazz “échos la nuit” review”

London Jazz News “échos la nuit” review

May 16, 2019 This feels like an album which should inspire poetry, rather than a review. Michaël Attias’ first solo album is an incredibly beautiful, patient, delicately unfurling recording, an intimate duo for alto saxophone and piano played by one person simultaneously.  Attias explores a variety of approaches to the combination of sax and piano.Continue reading “London Jazz News “échos la nuit” review”

Downtown Music Gallery “échos la nuit” review

April 5, 2019 New York is filled with dozens (hundreds?) of sax players who continue to evolve and thrive, no matter how much recognition they get or deserve. Every week, the pool or ocean of strong saxists & composers gets deeper. Michaël Attias is one of those gifted players and composers who I’ve been followingContinue reading “Downtown Music Gallery “échos la nuit” review”

New York Times “échos la nuit” review

April 4, 2019 On Friday, Attias will release “échos la nuit”, an album of slow, ruminative solo recordings on which he plays both the alto saxophone (his primary instrument) and the piano. Hearing these 12 tracks is like inspecting the mysterious line drawings of a beloved artist. Sometimes you’ll almost discern the contour of a landscape orContinue reading “New York Times “échos la nuit” review”

All About Jazz “échos la nuit” review

April 3, 2019 In the early days of Rahsaan Roland Kirk’s career, there were critics who viewed the blind man with three instruments hanging from his neck—two to be played simultaneously—as posturing. Then they heard him play. Forty years later, and filtered through the influence of four continents, Michael Attias takes up the task of improvising on twoContinue reading “All About Jazz “échos la nuit” review”

Music And More “échos la nuit” review

April 2, 2019 Michaël Attias is very impressive on this album, playing both alto saxophone and piano simultaneously, with no overdubs. He is performing everything on the album live and the music is completely improvised. The reverberation of the room and the resonance of the piano strings also set a sympathetic environment for this ambitiousContinue reading “Music And More “échos la nuit” review”

Take Five (WBGO) “échos la nuit” review

March 31, 2019 Alto saxophonist Michaël Attias has earned respect at the helm of several first-rate bands. But on his new release — échos la nuit, releasing Friday on the independent label Out Of Your Head — he pares down to a solo format, for the first time on record. In this respect, he’s joining a lineageContinue reading “Take Five (WBGO) “échos la nuit” review”

‘Brooding Rainswept Minimalism’: New York Music Daily “échos la nuit” review

March 24, 2019 Michaël Attias’ new album échos la nuit [. . .] evokes an iconic midnight Manhattan of the mind: rain-soaked streets, sax player on the corner alone, desolate phrases echoing into the darkness.  What’s different about the record – Attias’ first solo release – is that he plays both alto sax and piano,Continue reading “‘Brooding Rainswept Minimalism’: New York Music Daily “échos la nuit” review”

JazzTimes “Nerve Dance” review

July 14, 2017 Saxophonist-composer Michaël Attias has studied and played with two masters of structure and space, Anthony Braxton and Paul Motian. To the extent he is a traditionalist, Attias reveres Bird, Coltrane and Ornette not for their place in the firmament, but for their willingness to take risks. On Nerve Dance, Attias has assembledContinue reading “JazzTimes “Nerve Dance” review”